7 Reasons Why You Should Choose a Retirement Advisor (Instead of a Salesperson)

7 Reasons Why You Should Choose a Retirement Advisor (Instead of a Salesperson)

Are you turning 65 soon and thinking about retirement? Then buckle up. An onslaught of sales mail is coming your way. You might even get a few sales calls and knocks on your door as well. Salespeople are definitely assertive. And once you are between 3-6 months of your 65th birthday, hundreds of them will be vying for your attention, Medicare Advantage Plans and Supplement insurance extended in hand.


But I don’t think you should buy from them.


It’s not that I have a special vendetta against salespeople. You just have a better choice available: the reserved, resourceful guys on the fringes of the chaos, just waiting for you to come to them. That’s right, I recommend seeing a retirement advisor, and here’s why:


Advisors Have More Certification

I’m not saying there aren’t well-studied salespeople, but it isn’t the norm. An advisor, on the other hand, will almost always have some form of certification. They have to. Because they aren’t just sweet talking you into a healthcare plan, they are working with you to develop a comprehensive retirement strategy based on your unique situation. You need skill to do this. You need to know your industry backwards and forwards. This takes reading the right books and completing the right classes. It takes a certain level of certified expertise.

But be careful: Not all certifications are equal.  Here is a link to some of the most significant certifications.


They Specialize

Be leery of those who “specialize” in Medicare Supplements, Long-term care insurance, home and auto, life insurance, annuities, rollovers, and pet insurance. If their list is long and their Santa bag of products is larger, there is a good chance they’re the proverbial Jack-of-all trades who is—unfortunately—a master at none. Typically, an advisor isn’t like this. They will pick a few areas of finance or insurance and specialize. Their specialization leads to mastery. And their mastery leads to good advice and service.


They Are Accessible

They have an office space, so you know where to find them. They have office hours, so you know when they are available. When you call, they pick up. When you email, they respond. Predictability is the key. This is because their job isn’t just to sell (although they do this as well); it is to service their products afterwards. Claim issues? Questions? Concerns? An advisor sticks around long enough to tackle them.


They Educate You

The goal of an advisor is not to decide for you. It is to educate you, so you can make a decision for yourself. They will give you recommendations, of course. They aren’t just going to slap down 11 supplements, 24 drug plans, and several dozen Advantage Plans and say, “Choose!” But the point is, you make the choice to buy. You know the advantages and disadvantages of different options (because they taught you).  And you become the driving force of your own fate. So when plans go well, you don’t just have an advisor to thank; you can also thank yourself.


They Challenge You

Advisors aren’t just “yes men”. They are straight up with you. When you wander onto a questionable path, they care enough to stop you. I remember when a client of ours stormed in, fighting mad about the weak points of his employer plan. He wanted to get off it immediately and onto Medicare. But I knew this was an emotionally charged decision. Sometimes employer plans can be frustrating, but it was going to be way more expensive for him to get on Medicare. It took quite a bit of convincing, but I challenged him. It’s what an advisor does. Your first instincts are not always the best ones.


They Give You Time to Process

A lot of salespeople try to communicate something called “urgency”. This isn’t always a bad thing. Some situations are just urgent! For instance, I almost always recommend getting on Medicare when you are first eligible because not doing so can result in life long penalties. But a lot of this communicated “urgency” is just to rush you into buying a product. But advisors give you time to think things over. They realize that you want a methodical approach, a framework for weighing all your options.


They Are Client-Centered

 An advisor focuses on you, not the product. The whole process starts with an analysis of your situation and ends with your decision. Advisors advise people that buy products. Salesmen sell products that people buy.  This seems like splitting hairs, but listen to the people around you. Have you ever heard someone say, “Yeah, this guy came by my house and sold me this?” Notice the lack of agency. They didn’t buy it. Someone sold it to them. That is a sure sign of a product-centered approach: a sense of buyer’s guilt and a subtle, underlying regret.


Before I end this post, I want to make something very clear. I am not saying that salesmen are bad people. And I am not saying that all advisors are these haloed angels in disguise. But I know what it is like to be on both sides. I’ve worked for a large brokerage firm, a large insurance company, and a large bank. And in all 3, I had the same problem: I felt bound by the ever-present pressure of sales quotas. I tried to advise and do what was best for the client, but—for all intents and purposes—I was a salesperson. My job was to sell products that people buy.


Now that I’ve switched sides, I will never go back. The advising side is just better. It is better for clients. And it’s better for everyone, really.


But enough about me. Now back to you. You are approaching retirement, readying yourself to leave that stressful job behind and explore new hobbies, new places, and new experiences. Or maybe you just want to stay local and spend more time with family.

But whatever your situation, I want to make a suggestion. As an advisor, I want to advise. Whoever you choose to help you with retirement, makes sure it is someone you can absolutely trust. Makes sure it is a person who is knowledgeable in the area you need the most help. And make sure they aren’t just there to sell products to people, but rather to invest in people who buy products.


Your retirement decisions are just that important.


If you are confused and interested in some Medicare planning help, click here to sign up for our free workshop! No high-pressure sales pitches here, just in-depth discussion and Q and A about Medicare.


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