Category: Retirement Planning

When Should I Take Social Security? — 4 Questions to Ask Yourself Before Making a Decision

When Should I Take Social Security? — 4 Questions to Ask Yourself Before Making a Decision

Wow. That is a whopper of a question. And with social security getting a lot more media coverage lately, it is a question on the forefront of many minds just like yours. Most experts will answer with a resounding “wait!” “Wait until your full retirement age!” Or even “Wait until you are 70!”

 

And I am inclined to agree with them on many accounts, but this only tells a little bit of the story.

 

The truth is that no one can offer you a definite yes or no, now or later, 62 or 70 answer. It depends on a great number of factors:  your personal goals, convictions, health, and financial situation. This is why—instead of trying (and failing) to answer the question for you myself—I am going to offer you some guidepost questions for you to ask yourself. If answered thoroughly, the questions will lead you down a path to a good decision.

 

1.  Will I Continue Working Full Time?

The first question you should ask yourself is whether or not you are going to continue employment.  Because if you retire prior to your full retirement age, income matters when it comes to Social Security benefits. If you make it over the $16,920 a year earnings-test amount, Social Security begins reducing your benefit check. Having a higher income over your lifetime actually helps your benefits, but while you are receiving them—not so much.  In fact, for every $2 over the earnings-test amount, $1 will be deducted from your benefits checks for the year.

 

Allow me to put this into perspective. This means that a $2000 a month check ($24,000 a year) can vanish very quickly. Let’s put it this way: a person making $64,920 a year (48,000 over the earnings-test amount) will have all of their benefits reduced to zero. It would be like they never signed up at all!

 

Part time work to keep you busy won’t usually reach the earnings-test amount, but—in almost every other case—I strongly recommend waiting.

 

2.  What Resources Do I Have?

If you decide that you have had enough of your stressful job and decide to retire, you will no longer have a steady source of income. This is where drawing Social Security earlier can come in handy.

 

But there are exceptions. For example, If you have a strong enough financial situation, you can get by without your social security check and maximize your benefits no problem.

 

So check your storehouses. Do you have a sufficient nest egg? A retirement plan like a 401(k) or IRA? Investments? Pension income? In other words, do you have something to live off of while you let your Social Security benefits accrue? If not, then you need to take social security. But if you do, it might be a good idea to delay.

 

3.  What’s My Life Expectancy?

It’s also important to remember that waiting to collect Social Security benefits is still a trade off. If you collect at age 66, for example, you will get more checks in the mail than if you wait until 70 (48 to be exact). But if you wait until 70, you will receive checks that are 32% bigger. The decision you are really trying to make is this: Do I want more, smaller checks now or fewer, larger checks later?

 

This is where life expectancy swoops in to help. If you live a long life, larger checks later is usually the better bet because you will likely reach your break-even point, the age when the larger check begins to benefit you. (For an in-the ballpark figure, the break even point for many people is 10-12 years after their full retirement age.) But if you don’t, taking more, smaller checks now is the right approach. You may not have time to wait.  In that case, reap the benefits now.

 

In order to determine life expectancy, you can consider your current health status and your family’s history with longevity, but this would be a shot-in-the-dark speculation.

 

Instead, I recommend using a highly customized life expectancy calculator like livingto100.com. It takes into account everything from exercise habits, family history, all the way to how you barbecue your meats (not sure how this affects life expectancy) to create a truly personalized calculation. Of course, this is still speculation, but at least it is speculation based on carefully- researched scientific data. Not as much a shot in the dark.

 

4.  Am I Married?

If you’ve been married for more than a couple weeks, you know that marriage changes everything. From finances to weekend plans to what you’re going to make for dinner, you’ve got someone else to think about.

 

Marriage also affects Social Security. For instance, you might have poor health and a bleak life expectancy. In this case, it might make sense for you to take out Social Security early. But what about your spouse? When you pass away, your spouse receives your full Social Security benefit. If he or she lives long, it may still be beneficial to delay.

 

And this is just one of quite a few examples.

 

A Final Thought

I would like to emphasize this point one more time: the question of when to take Social Security is not one-size-fits-all. It’s not strategic to delay benefits if you don’t have the means to do so. But the “I might die tomorrow anyhow, so I might as well take it now” approach is not the best either. In order to get to the right answer, you first have to ask the right questions.  So analyze your situation, learn all you can, and—at the end of the day—sit down with an expert you trust to put it all together.

 

Need some help making decisions about Social Security? We are offering a workshop on Social Security planning on September 7 in our Sidney office.  You can sign up by clicking here:  Social Security planning workshop or by calling our office at 937-492-8800.  As always, if you have any questions, feel free to call our office any time.

New Workshops Announcement

We are expanding our workshop offerings! Beginning in August, we will still be offering our Welcome to Medicare workshop, but we are adding in a Social Security Planning workshop, along with a 401(k) planning workshop. Our new series is titled “Life After Work” and will help people ages 62 and up start planning for retirement, as well as introduce them to the world of Medicare.

Visit our workshops page at www.seniormark.com/workshops to sign up for one or all of our workshops!

We look forward to seeing you there!

Attention Retirees: Don’t Fall For These 2 Medicare Sales Tactics

Attention Retirees: Don’t Fall For These 2 Medicare Sales Tactics

Before the Medicare Improvements for Patients and Providers Act passed in July of 2008, Medicare Supplement salespeople had the upper hand. They could call you as much as they wished and show up at your doorstep uninvited. Medicare sales were practically a warzone.

Now, however, they have to be a little bit more clever about their sales tactics. Since they can’t contact you (except by mail) without your consent, they have to find some way to get permission from you—whether you realize what you are asking for or not. Here are two key strategies they use.

Online Quote Generators

It seems like an easy way to shop and compare Medicare Supplement prices in your area, but it may lead to a bombardment of unwanted calls and emails. Here’s how it works: When you put in your personal information like phone number or email, you consent to being contacted. You are essentially (but unknowingly) saying “hit me with your best shot!”

This is when the owner of these quote generators can sell your information to as many agents who care to buy. If you are one of the unlucky few whose contact is sold widely, you are in for an Armageddon of sales calls just like the barrage a client of ours so nobly braved. He claimed that within one minute of plugging in his phone number, the calls stormed in. To spare you the details, let’s just say he stopped picking up after 30 calls.

Tear and Return Reply Cards

I’ll bet your mailbox is practically bursting with Medicare literature. And I’ll bet a lot of them have a tear off reply card that asks for your contact information. Although it may seem official with its big “Do Not Destroy” stamps or fancy seals, this can be a ploy as well. If you can’t tell by the other content, there is a dead give away at the bottom of the mail in fine print where it says that an insurance representative may contact you.

 

“No. I’m not interested.”

I hope you don’t read this as “everything I get in the mail is bad” or “I should never give anyone my contact information” because this is simply not the case. There are wonderfully helpful people in the Medicare business who ask for your personal information. In fact, although we don’t ask for personal information, we send out mailers every month and have a quoting tool on our website!

The purpose of this post is to help you understand the difference between someone who trying to assist you and someone who is trying to badger you. No one wants his inbox overrun with spam. No one wants to answer a firing squad of phone calls a day with a sighing “I’m not interested.”

We know you don’t either.

If you would like to shop Medicare Supplements safely, click here to access our quoting tool. We don’t ask for any personal information!

Underrated Plan G Supplement Could Save You Hundreds a Year

Underrated Plan G Supplement Could Save You Hundreds a Year

Plan F is Medicare Supplement’s Cadillac plan. It is the one with the most comprehensive benefits of all 11 plans, reducing potential out-of-pocket spending for health insurance to an all-time low. It covers all Medicare approved expenses including deductibles, coinsurance, skilled nursing, and much more. Talk about a smooth ride! So when my clients are looking for a Medicare Supplement of high quality, that is usually the one they hop into. It is secure. It is hassle-free. And it’s just dang pretty.

 

But it is not always the best value. In fact, it rarely is, and here’s why:

 

Introducing Plan G

F G
Basic Benefits, including 100% Part B coinsurance Basic Benefits, including 100% Part B coinsurance
Skilled Nursing Facility Coinsurance Skilled Nursing Facility Coinsurance
Part A Deductible Part A Deductible
Part B Deductible $183
Part B Excess (100%) Part B Excess (100%)
Foreign Travel Emergency Foreign Travel Emergency

 *Red means you pay

Take a thoughtful look at the Plan F and G benefits side by side. You’ll notice that these two plans cover most of the same things. From basic benefits to the hefty $1316 Part A deductible, it’s identical. The only difference is that Plan G does not cover the annual $183 Part B deductible.

                       

Cutting Costs

Yet the premium difference between these two plans is often staggering: sometimes $30- 50 or more a month. And if you take into account the amount saved in premiums, Plan F starts to lose its luster.

 

How about an example? Let’s say a 65-year old female from Sidney, Ohio is shopping for a supplement. For AARP’s Plan F, she would pay $151.90 per month. And for an Aetna Plan G, she would pay $113.95 a month. That is a $455.40 a year difference! Although she would be giving up the benefit of having her $183 deductible paid for, she would still save $272.40 a year by choosing Plan G!

 

It seems the best benefits don’t always mean the best value. The overall cost is what counts, 100% of the time. So when shopping luxury, keep this in mind: Always check to see what you are paying for. You just might find a better deal elsewhere.

 

Curious about how much a plan G would cost you? Use our Medicare Supplement quoting tool to find out! Click here to find out your best rates!  https://seniormark.com/resources/

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Do I Really Need a Medicare Supplement?

Do I Really Need a Medicare Supplement?

 

David Belk, a doctor and anti-supplement activist says, “…If you have Medicare and buy a supplemental policy with your own money, you are effectively giving an insurance company your money so that they can keep it.”

 

Wow. This statement is moving. For those who have had a Medicare Supplement Policy for years, it slaps you in the face with regret.

 

And for those who may not be on Medicare and have yet to purchase Medicare Supplement Insurance, it frees you. It justifies a decision that will save you money on premium month to month.

 

However, it is not entirely true. He has a point, but—ultimately—it represents a fundamental misunderstanding of what insurance is.

 

If you take this statement at face value, it would imply that virtually all insurance is worthless.

 

Here’s why: in the vast majority of cases, people pay into insurance and then rarely use it. This is what keeps insurance companies in the black.

 

How many people spend thousands over years on homeowner’s insurance and never have their house burn down? How many people purchase car insurance and only experience a couple of fender benders over their lifetime? Are they essentially “giving their money away to an insurance company”? Yes, you could say that, and it wouldn’t be inaccurate, just a bit misleading.

 

Because you don’t buy insurance for things you expect! Rather, you buy it for things with a high dollar amount of risk and a low probability of happening!

 

You can’t insure what is high risk and high probability. Take Alex Honnold, for example. He spends his waking hours climbing steep ravines with no safety harness. For hours a day, he is one missed footing away from plummeting to his doom. Do you think he is going to be able to get life insurance? It’s almost laughable. This is a high risk, high probability scenario. Of course no insurance company will take a chance on him!

 

You can insure against a low risk, low probability scenario, but why would you want to? Do you want pet insurance for your grandson’s gerbil? Obviously not. Even a low-premium insurance plan wouldn’t be worth it. What did you pay for it? 30 bucks? Maybe fifty if it’s some hypoallergenic, exotic breed? Either way, it’s not a high enough risk.

 

So this begs the question…what does a supplement cover? Is it something that is low probability and high risk?

 

Well…there are varying coverage levels, but even the lowest premium plans cover Medicare’s scariest coverage gap: the unlimited out-of-pocket spending limit.

 

Sure, a lot of them cover “nickel and dime” copays and coinsurance costs that virtually eliminate hassle and reduce costs, but this is just icing on the cake. The real substance of a Supplement Plan is that it puts a cap on your potential out-of-pocket spending.

With Medicare alone, there is absolutely no limit to what you can spend.

 

One of our clients had triple bypass surgery and ended up with a $7,000 bill. My father-in-law with lung cancer had approximately $30-40,000 in charges for outpatient chemotherapy and radiation. I ran into a man who—after a few years of extended illness—racked up over $140,000 in bills that Medicare alone didn’t cover.

 

Can you imagine the devastation if any of these retirees forfeited Medicare Supplement Insurance? If these individuals had chosen Medicare alone, those outrageous bills would’ve been heaped upon their shoulders.

 

Now, what are the chances of this happening to you?

Not very high.

But that is the point! What are the chances that your house is going to burn down? What are the chances that your car will get totaled? You can cite statistics like Dr. Belk and say, “Look…not very many people need this insurance.” However, this doesn’t make those isolated cases any less scary. And it doesn’t change the fact that, from 2006-2015, Medicare Supplement Insurance companies consistently paid out over 75% in claims what they gathered in premiums. Insurance is not about whether or not you are going to get out what you pay in; it is about peace of mind.

 

So yes…I do recommend buying Medicare Supplement Insurance. You don’t necessarily need an expensive, luxury plan, but having something in place is essential. Even if you can’t afford a Supplement, you can (at the very least), purchase a low or no cost Medicare Advantage Plan that will cap your annual out-of-pocket spending at $4-6,000.

 

This won’t guarantee that you won’t be “giving an insurance company your money” but it will guarantee that you can live your retirement life freely and fearlessly, knowing that—in all those unlikely but possible scenarios—

 

you’re still covered.

 

Wondering how much a Medicare Supplement will cost you? Click here to use our Medicare Supplement quoting tool to find out!

 

 

One Priceless Secret to Help You Find a Trustworthy Retirement Advisor

One Priceless Secret to Help You Find a Trustworthy Retirement Advisor

You can’t choose retirement help based on an agent’s smile or friendliness or wrinkleless pants. And contrary to popular belief, the handshake shouldn’t make or break your decision either. The truth is, even if he or she is a nice guy or gal, that doesn’t make the person any more trustworthy.

 

Not that those things don’t matter at all. I hope the person you work with during this crucial transition isn’t a jerk. All I am asking is for you to consider this as well: Is he a captive or an independent agent? Because knowing the difference…well…it can make a world of difference.

 

Tied Hands

A captive agent works for one company. Their job is to sell that one company’s products. They can’t lead you to the best-valued plan for your unique needs because they are limited to the insurance plans that their company offers.

 

Here’s something you’ll never hear a car salesman say: “Yeah, you know what you need, sir? You need to go visit the dealer down the street. He’s got exactly what you are looking for…and at half the price! Here, let me get the directions for you.”

 

It’s the same thing with captive agents. Even if there’s a better deal with another company, they’re not going to tell you that! Just like a car salesman, they have to sell what’s on the lot if they want to make a commission. In other words, their hands are tied. And when their hands are tied behind their back, it’s a bit more tempting for them to cross their fingers.

 

Hands Free Help

On the other hand (I promise I didn’t try that), independent agents are on their own. Since they don’t work for any one specific company, they can instead work for you, shopping plans from all the companies they represent. By analyzing your situation, they can find the one health care plan that is best suited to you. Or—if there are several—they can talk to you honestly about the advantages and disadvantages of your different options. It’s that simple!

 

And that’s why the captive vs. independent agent dichotomy is so vital when you are deciding who to work with. Because—when compared side by side—the independent advisor is the obvious choice…

 

Hands down. (I’m deeply sorry…I had to.)

 

Are you interested in working with an independent advisor with a passion for helping retirees? Then call Seniormark at 937-492-8800 to set up a free consultation.

 

 

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3 Questions You MUST Ask Yourself Before Enrolling in Medicare Part B

3 Questions You MUST Ask Yourself Before Enrolling in Medicare Part B

When approaching 65, most people sign up for Part B, but not everyone. And for good reason, too—not just because they didn’t plan well and missed the deadline. If you are wondering if you are one of these few, stay tuned! The answer is dependent on these three questions:

 

Question 1: Will I (Or My Spouse) Continue Working?

You might be more than ready and able to clock out of that stuffy office or factory for the last time. If this is you, go ahead and enroll. Lack of active employment forfeits your right to delay Part B (even if you have retiree benefits from either your or your spouse’s employer).

However, you or your spouse might continue active employment past age 65 and have insurance coverage through your employer plan. In this case, move on to question #2.

 

Question #2: Who Pays First?

Medicare or the employer? This is an important question to ask because if Medicare pays first and you don’t get on part B, you could be stuck footing some pretty hefty bills on outpatient services. Your employer won’t pay for it because they expected you to get on Medicare. However, if the employer pays first, the decision to delay Part B and stick with your employer health insurance might save you cash on premiums.

The way it works is actually quite simple: Do you work for a company of 20 employees or more? Then the employer pays first. How about fewer than 20? Then Medicare pays first.

But don’t just assume. To be certain, ask your human resources department or employer. They might surprise you with their answer.

Refer to question 3 if you or your spouse is covered under a health plan that insures 20 or more employees.

For more information on the answer to this question, refer to this Kiplinger article entitled “Should You Enroll in Medicare If You Are Still Working?” The “Who Pays First” chart mid-page is especially helpful.

 

Question #3: Is Medicare Cheaper?

Some people have excellent employer plans that make sense to stay on. But for others, it is a toss up. And for a few, Medicare is clearly the cheaper option. The only way to find out is to perform a cost to benefits analysis to determine which is more cost effective. If the employer plan is more expensive, then sign up for Part B.

If this helped you come to a conclusion on enrolling in Part B coverage, I wish you sincere congratulations. You are one step closer to a smooth retirement transition. But—of course—you are not done yet. There are many more things to consider.

Turning 65 soon and not sure what to do? Click here to sign up for our free Medicare workshop. No high-pressure sales pitches here, just in-depth discussion about the ins and outs of Medicare!

If you would like our assistance to perform a cost/benefit analysis, or need more immediate answers to your questions, give our office a call at 937-492-8800 and we will see how we can help!

 

Turning 65 and Work For a Small Employer? Sign Up For Medicare Part B!

Turning 65 and Work For a Small Employer? Sign Up For Medicare Part B!

The general rule of thumb is if you have employer insurance through active employment, you can delay Part B of Medicare without penalty.

 

But that certainly doesn’t mean you should! There are cases, of course, when your employer plan is the better value, and it works out for you to opt out of part B. However, in other situations, it may be very costly.

 

For example, consider the woman who came into our office earlier this year with an $8000 bill for her outpatient surgery. She opted out of Part B, but she had insurance through active employment. Shouldn’t her employer plan cover it?

 

Well, not always. You see, her insurance was provided through a company that employed less than 20 people. This made Medicare the primary payer of her insurance. And when she didn’t have Medicare? Well…it wasn’t good.

 

The costly mistake had to do with how coordination of benefits works between employer insurance and Medicare. Let’s take an employer health insurance plan that covers 80/20 as an example (insurance pays 80%, you pay 20%)

 

When an employer plan covers 20 or more employees, the employer plan is the primary payer of your claims. Therefore, your employer insurance pays 80% of the bill and Medicare (if you have it) pays the remaining 20%. In this case, it is not necessary to have Part B; you can opt out. You’ll have to pay the remaining 20%, but it saves you the $134.00 a month Part B premium.

 

But if your employer plan covers less than 20 employees, Medicare pays first. The whole thing is flipped. So what if you get the previously mentioned expensive surgery and don’t have Medicare? It will not just carry over to your employer plan. They won’t pay the 80% that was supposed to be covered by Medicare. Instead, you will be lucky to get them to pay the 20%, leaving you on the hook…80% or more on the hook, which might just be $8000 in uncovered surgery procedures.

 

This is why it is so important to ensure that you are signing up for Medicare at the right time. Just because your neighbor can opt out of part B doesn’t mean you can. They might work for a Honda or a Copeland, a company with thousands of employees. You might work for a small business of 15 people.

 

So check with your boss or human resources department. Ask and make sure. It could save you from an unexpected, expensive, and potentially crippling bill.

 

Confused about Medicare and not sure what to do next? Download our free E-book here, and let us walk you through it!  Still have questions?  Call our office at 937-492-8800 to schedule a free, no obligation appointment!

 

Will I Be Able to Afford Medicare?

Will I Be Able to Afford Medicare?

The shortest and most honest answer is “I don’t know”. But I know this doesn’t help you answer the most pressing questions weighing on your mind as you approach retirement age. Am I ready? Or Should I delay my retirement? And most of all—how am I going to afford health care without my employer insurance?

 

So here’s what I am going to do. Using my 20 years of experience working with retirees, I am going to lay out a framework for what to expect when it comes to Medicare expenses. These will just be “in-the-ballpark” figures, but I believe they will help you come to a decision. You just might find that Medicare falls squarely into your budget.

 

So let’s get started with some good news.

 

Medicare Part A (Inpatient Care) Is Free

As long as you’ve paid into Social Security for at least 10 years, social security will return the favor with no associated Part A premium.

 

The Associated Part B (Outpatient Care) Monthly Premium is $134.00

This figure is adjusted for high income, but most people don’t fall into the high-income category. $134.00 will be your monthly premium unless you make $85,000 per year or more as an individual or $170,000 filing jointly.

 

From this point, the cost of Medicare is heavily affected by which path you take. You can boil down all the madness into two basic choices: Medicare Advantage or Original (traditional) Medicare.

 

The Traditional Medicare Route

If you choose the Traditional Medicare route, you will want Medicare Supplement Insurance to fill in the gaps of what Medicare doesn’t cover. Otherwise, there will be no limit to your out-of-pocket spending. The premiums for a Medicare Supplement range from $45-146 per month. However, we often recommend a plan G, which typically costs $110 per month. This is a fairly standard premium. It puts into perspective what you can expect a Medicare Supplement Plan to cost.

 

To cover your medications, you will also need a Part D prescription drug plan, which will cost in additional premium anywhere between $15 to $128 monthly. The average cost for a drug plan is $35.63 in 2017. The out-of-pocket costs associated with Part D vary greatly depending on your medications. It is impossible to estimate without knowing your specific situation.

 

The Medicare Advantage Route

Offered as an alternative to Traditional Medicare, Medicare Advantage is often the cheaper option when it comes to premiums. They are offered for prices within the range of $0-163 monthly with the average premium being approximately $60 per month. The Part D prescription drug plan is almost always rolled into the plan.

 

Caution: Check For Possible Out-of-pocket Costs

At first glance, it looks like the Medicare Advantage route is the obvious choice. But this fails to take into account the risk of out-of-pocket costs. With a Medicare Supplement (only available with Original Medicare), the maximum out-of-pocket is only $166-366 annually for Plan G. However, in an advantage plan, it is more of a pay-as-you-go approach. There are less monthly premiums; but copays, coinsurance, and deductibles are much higher. The potential out-of-pocket for an advantage plan can be as a high as $3500-6000 per year or more!

 

The Costs At a Glance


So there you have it! This should give you a good idea of what Medicare costs for the average 65-year old. But—as I said before—the cost of Medicare is different for every person. If you are still concerned about being able to afford Medicare, contact us for a free consultation. We will assess your financial and health situation to find an overall plan that meets your needs, concerns, and pocketbook. Ensuring you a successful and secure transition into retirement is our number one priority.

 

There are a lot circumstances that may prevent you from retiring. But I believe that the affordability of health insurance shouldn’t be one.

 

Disclaimer: Numbers are based on Ohio 45365.

 

Turning 65 soon and not sure what to do? Click here to sign up for our free Medicare workshop. No high-pressure sales pitches here, just in-depth discussion about the ins and outs of Medicare!

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Investing Fact Check: No One Can Predict the Future

Investing Fact Check: No One Can Predict the Future

Not the common investor. Not your financial planner. Not even the “big wig” finance-savvy gurus.

 

I get it. It’s alluring to think you might have a competitive edge. The seductive power of huge yields in a short amount of time is almost magnetic. And it’s definitely a good marketing point for investment advisors who claim they can “beat the market”. But the truth is, market timing and stock picking just don’t work.

 

Of course, people score big sometimes. They might even get lucky a few years in a row. But, in a way, this is just dangerous. Like a gambler with a string of good hands, these people may begin to think they’re invincible, play hard for another year, and—eventually—return home with empty hands in their pockets and a droopy tail between their legs.

 

The results are in.

In fact, they’ve been in for a long time: When it comes to investing, you are your own worst enemy. Investor behavior consistently causes people to underperform over the long haul.

 

In Dalbar’s 22nd Annual Analysis of Investor Behavior, they discovered that the average investor underperformed the S&P 500 by 3.66% in 2015. According to Dalbar, “while the broader market made incremental gains of 1.38%, the average equity investor suffered a more-than-incremental loss of -2.28%”. This type of data is consistent over the last 20 to 30 years. Over the last 20 years, the S&P 500 has outperformed the investor by 3.52%.

 

And with the “expert” investment managers, the results still aren’t that hot. In 2014, 86% of them failed to beat the market.

 

So why is this happening?

Maybe it has something to do with the fact that the average equity fund retention rate of 2015 was 4.10 years. This means that every 4.10 years the average investor changed his mutual fund to chase the hot returns of another investment option, ultimately trying to beat the market, ultimately believing they (or a financial guru) could predict the future. If you just jumped down to this point, see the above statistics. It didn’t work.

 

So why do investors still believe it?

If it doesn’t work, then why do people still do it? There are many reasons why. Perhaps it is just lack of research and reflection. Or perhaps it is because people are looking at their stocks in a vacuum, thinking that their 6% return isn’t bad even though the S&P performed at 8%.

 

But I think the biggest reason is that they don’t look at the big picture. They see the ads that say “if you would’ve picked this stock last month, you would be up 40%” or “Here at (insert investing company name here), we’ve beat the market 3 years in a row”. They see the Warren Buffets of the world and forget that these are just isolated cases. When you zoom out and see the million other people who tried to beat the markets and failed, the truth comes into focus.

 

So—in the end—you can choose to do what many investors are doing.

 

Or you can choose the time-tested, statistically verified way: diversify your portfolio and wait…without touching it. If you’re retiring soon, I recommend this strategy. You don’t have time for risky moves. You don’t have time to make up for heavy losses.

 

Instead, you need an investment strategy that safeguards your portfolio from crippling losses, while allowing it to grow—slowly but surely—well into your retirement. It’s not flashy. It won’t get you on the cover of Money Magazine. But unlike trying to predict the future—

 

It works.

 

Want a Certified Financial Planner to analyze your portfolio at no cost to you? Call Seniormark at 937-492-8800 for a free consultation.

 

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