Category: Medicare Annual Enrollment

10 Terms to Beef Up Your Medicare Literacy

10 Terms to Beef Up Your Medicare Literacy

In this day and age, you have a vast pool of knowledge available to you. But none of that matters if you can’t understand any of it. If you’ve done any researching on the Internet about Medicare, you know what I mean. To help you out, I compiled a list of important terms that often catch retirees unaware.

 

  1. Annual Enrollment Period (AEP)

The AEP is the busy time of year for Insurance companies such as ours. You can think of it as the black Friday of Medicare. It is the time of year (October 15—December 7) when Medicare beneficiaries can switch plans, drop plans, and join new ones. It is an open market, a bustling time for anyone involved with the Medicare industry.

 

  1. Open Enrollment Period

The day you turn 65 and are signed up for Medicare Part B is the first day of your open enrollment. This 6-month long time frame is the window in which you can get on ANY Medicare Supplement plan, regardless of health! You will want to take advantage of this…your options narrow significantly outside of open enrollment.

 

  1. Deductible

A deductible is the money you have to pay upfront before the benefits of a plan begin. For example, Part A of Medicare has a $1340 deductible. They will not cover anything until you reach it.

 

  1. Copayments

Copays are a set dollar amount you pay in addition to the payment made by the insurer (whether it be Medicare or a private insurance company). Think of the $10-50 fees when you visit the doctor’s office or buy a certain prescription drug.

 

  1. Coinsurance

This is very similar to copayments, but it is a set percentage instead of a dollar amount. For example, the Medicare Part B coinsurance is 20%. This means you pay 20% of the total bill, not a set dollar amount.

 

  1. Out-of-pocket Costs

All three of the previous terms (deductibles, copays, and coinsurance) are all a part of a much larger concept of out-of-pocket costs. In other words, your out-of-pocket costs are everything you pay for your healthcare beyond your premium. One warning you will receive a lot is this: With only traditional Medicare (parts A and B), there is no limit to your out-of-pocket spending. Yes, I am low-key warning you again, but hopefully you fully understand it now.

 

  1. Donut Hole

Speaking of out-of-pocket costs, for a Part D drug plan, they are highest in the donut hole, a gap in prescription drug coverage. You enter the donut hole when you reach $3750 in total costs and exit it once you reach $5000 in out-of-pocket costs.

 

  1. Drug Tiers

Drug plan companies often organize the medications they cover into levels. They call these levels—you guessed it—tiers. Drugs on a lower tier (often generic brands) have lower copays and coinsurance. Drug on a higher tier (such as brand name or specialty drugs) often have higher associated costs.

 

  1. PPO

PPO stands for Preferred Provider Organization. So a PPO is a health plan that has a network of “preferred” doctors and hospitals. If you use those doctors and hospitals, they reward you will lower out-of-pocket costs.

 

  1. HMO

HMOs (Health Maintenance Plans) are a little bit more intense than PPOs. It is the same idea, but HMO plans won’t cover you at all if you don’t use their network of hospitals and doctors.

 

That brings this list to close. If you are still confused about a term on this list, ask us for help in the comments section. Have you come across another difficult word on your Medicare planning journey that you think we should add? Let us know. We want to hear from you!

 

Annual Enrollment is the only time of year you can switch your Medicare Advantage Plan or Part D Drug Plan! Looking to review your plans with a Certified Senior Advisor this open enrollment season? Call Seniormark at 937-492-8800 or click here to set up a free consultation.

Can I Really Get a Medicare Advantage Plan For Free?

Can I Really Get a Medicare Advantage Plan For Free?

Yes, for quite a few Medicare Advantage plans, you will not have to pay a dime in premiums. And to sweeten the deal, you can even get extra benefits like gym memberships or a built in drug coverage with some plans. But I’m very stingy with my use of the word “free.”

 

From my experience, an Advantage Plan is free in the same way the newborn puppies of your best friend’s dog are “free.” You may not have to pay for the puppy, but how many know having man’s best friend around the house isn’t exactly a recipe for super savings (especially if you’ve got furniture and footwear that look especially appetizing in black and white)?

 

You see, a Medicare Advantage Plan might not cost anything in premiums, but it may eat up your money in the end. I’m not saying they aren’t right for some people, in fact; I’ve placed people in $0 Advantage Plans to their long-term satisfaction. For the cost-conscious retiree who is romping into retirement, healthy as a horse, it may be the best option. But before you purchase one, make sure you understand the hassles and extra costs that come along with the decision. I’ve outlined a few of the most important ones:

 

Networks

Advantage Plans have networks of health care providers that they have contracted with, usually within a fairly tight geographic area. If you do not receive care at one of their pre-picked providers, it can mean much higher co pays and coinsurance amounts. If you are in an HMO plan, they may not even cover you at all while receiving care out of network. This can work just fine for a person who stays local most of the year, but it does put the burden on you to ensure that your health care provider is in-network. Making mistakes could cost you heavily.

 

Inconsistency

With a Medicare Supplement, the benefits are stable, but with an Advantage Plan, this is hardly ever the case.

 

Since the private insurance companies that offer Advantage Plans re-file their contract with Medicare every year, the benefits always change—sometimes dramatically. One of your preferred doctors could go out of network. Co payments, coinsurance, and deductibles can all shoot up. This is why you must review your plan every year so you won’t be caught unaware. If you set your plan to the side and forget about it for even one year, it can be quite upsetting financially.

 

Potentially High Out-of-pocket Costs

I always like to remind people that Advantage Plans have more of a “pay as you go” approach. You pay less in premiums, yes.  But you may make up for it in deductibles, co payments, and coinsurance. For example, almost all Advantage Plans still keep you on the hook for the 20% coinsurance on Part B. That’s fine for an x-ray, but not as much for an outpatient surgery that may be $20,000 or more.

So be aware, Advantage plans do limit your annual out-of-pocket spending, but these caps are generally pretty high. If you have a period of extended illness, you could spend anywhere from $3500-6000 per year or more!

 

That doesn’t sound like free to me.

 

That is why you need to be wary of salespeople who may just be trying to convince you to switch to a Medicare Advantage Plan this Annual Enrollment Season. It may be right for you, but—then again—it may cost you a lot more in the long run.

 

Looking to review your plans with a Certified Senior Advisor this Annual enrollment season? Call Seniormark at 937-492-8800 or click here to set up a free consultation.

 

Is There an Advantage to Medicare Advantage?

Is There an Advantage to Medicare Advantage?

According to Reader’s Digest, 1 in 4 retirees receive their health insurance coverage from a Medicare Advantage Plan. And I can certainly understand the attraction. Premiums as low as $0 a month. Prescription drug plans often included. What’s not to like?

 

But—as it goes for most purchases—you get what you pay for. And when it comes to Medicare Advantage Plans, they definitely have a dark side. Allow me to shed some light on the subject.

 

The Medicare (Dis)Advantage Plan

Networks

Medicare Advantage Plans contract with specific hospitals and doctors, usually within a relatively tight-knit geographic area. If you don’t receive care from the ones with whom they’ve “networked”, you may be subject to higher co pays or coinsurance at each visit.  Depending on the plan, they may not even cover your expenses at all.

 

This can be a problem for anyone, but especially for those who travel frequently. So for you snowbirds out there who fly south for the winter and leave us all to freeze, this serves you right (forgive my jealous outburst). You may find yourself with less (or even no) coverage at your vacation home. Although they will still cover you in emergencies, that doesn’t mean it won’t be an expensive hassle.

 

Inconsistency

Because Medicare Advantage Plans are funded by government subsidy, the cost and benefits can change drastically from year to year. If the government decides to spend your tax dollars elsewhere, your plan may let prices creep (or even leap) up, while benefits wane. This all depends on politics, which—as you already know—is rarely consistent.

 

Potentially High Out-of-Pocket Costs

Medicare Advantage Plans have more of a pay-as-you-go approach. Although the premium is low, deductibles, coinsurance and co pays are often much higher. This is not a problem if you are healthy, but if you are struck with sudden illness, you might be stuck with astronomically high out-of-pockets: $3,500 to $6000 a year or more! And if the diagnosis is bad enough, you may not qualify to switch to a Supplement plan.

 

Let’s take a real life example.

A client of ours came in with an Advantage Plan. He was diagnosed with cancer in fall of 2012 and started chemotherapy immediately. Since he was in charge of 20% of the costs due to his plan, he very speedily met his $7,500 annual out-of-pocket limit. Then it was the New Year, and his out-of-pocket limit reset. He continued chemo-treatments, which lead to another $7,500 expense. That is $15,000 of spending in less than 6 months!

 

And since a cancer diagnosis prevented him from switching to a Supplement, he had to stay with his Advantage Plan. He was stuck, and—needless to say—very unhappy about it.

 

So Here’s the Bottom Line…

Is there an advantage to a Medicare Advantage Plan?

If your doctors are in your plan’s network, you stay on top of changes, and—here’s a big one—you don’t get horribly ill (leading to high out-of-pocket costs), then yes! The Medicare Advantage dark side has vanished. The force is with you, and you’ve saved hundreds or even thousands in premium costs.

 

But you need to assess your situation. You need to take the risk into consideration. 1 in 4 people might be on a Medicare Advantage Plan, but that doesn’t mean it is right for you!

 

Looking to switch to or purchase a Medicare supplement? Call Seniormark at 937-492-8800 for a free consultation. We are here to help.

Why You Can Try a Medicare Advantage Plan at No Risk

Why You Can Try a Medicare Advantage Plan at No Risk

 

Infomercials have done it for years.  When people feel uneasy about trying a new product, they offer a free trial or a money back guarantee.  It provides security for the buyer to know that even if the supposed benefits of a product were oversold or blown out of proportion, he can still send it back.  There’s no risk.

 

Well, Medicare offers something very similar.  It’s called the “Medicare Advantage Trial Right”.

 

A lot of people are uncomfortable with trying Medicare Advantage because they don’t want to feel trapped in a plan they hate until the next Annual Enrollment Period.  The trial period takes this risk away.  As long as it will be your first time enrolling in a Medicare Advantage Plan, you qualify for Medicare Trial Right!  This means that—no matter what time of year it is—you can drop your Medicare Advantage plan with no penalty and enroll in a Medicare Supplement Plan.  This “free trial” period lasts 12 months from the date the Advantage Plan coverage goes into effect.

 

But as the infomercial cliché puts so obnoxiously…

 

 WAIT…There’s More!

 

Some people believe that if they have pre-existing conditions and get on an Advantage Plan, they will be denied switching back to a Medicare Supplement Policy based on their health.  In other words, they think that if they give up their Supplement for an Advantage Plan, they will never get it back.  But that’s where the “money back guarantee” part of the deal comes in.  Regardless of health, the Medicare Trial Right guarantees that you will be able to get back on a Supplement, no medical underwriting involved.

 

It’s true that Medicare Advantage plans are alluring with their sometimes shockingly low premiums.  But they aren’t always the right (see here for related article) fit for retirees.  They change unpredictably and can be quite a hassle.  This is why the Trial Right is so beneficial.  It allows you to try a plan on for size, and then toss it back on the rack.  To test drive it around the block, and then park it in the lot if it doesn’t meet your standards.  And all the while, it guarantees that your old, trusty Medicare Supplement will be there.

 

Want to look into switching to a Medicare Advantage Plan?  Call Seniormark at 937-492-8800 for a free consultation.

Drug Plan Check Up: Is your Drug Plan Still the Best Plan for You?

It’s annual enrollment…is your Part D drug plan still the best plan for you?

As most of us remember, there are some VERY important dates associated with Annual Enrollment.  As we discussed earlier in “Don’t set it and forget it” we don’t want to miss these dates.  There are several things that need to be done during annual enrollment but for now let’s focus on the Part D drug plan.  DON’T ASSUME THAT SINCE YOUR PLAN COVERED YOUR MEDICATIONS LAST YEAR THAT YOUR MEDICATIONS WILL BE COVERED THIS YEAR.  Yes, I know, it isn’t convenient that things change, but they do.  So please make sure you review your part D plan this annual enrollment.

For 2019 there will be more than 20 drug plans available in Ohio.  How in the world do you know which is best for you?  Well, there are several things to consider.  Your medications.  The plan’s formulary.  Your preferred pharmacy.  The plan’s preferred pharmacy.  The premium cost.  And so on…  You should have received the Annual Notice of Change for your current plan in late September so make sure you review it!   How do you know if your current plan is still the best plan for you in 2019?  Let’s face it, even if you try and do your homework this stuff is confusing!  As much as we would love to help everyone review their prescription drug plan for 2019, annual enrollment is just too busy for us.  We unfortunately can’t help with the Part D comparisons BUT there are people that can!    If you are still confused and unsure if you’re in the right plan for 2019, please call OSHIIP (Ohio Senior Health Insurance Information Program) at 1-800-686-1578.  OSHIIP trained volunteers are happy to help.  Make sure you have your Medicare card and list of prescription drugs handy.  If you don’t want to make a phone call, check with your pharmacy and see if they will help you re-shop your plan.  Some pharmacies will assist with this process.  And of course, if you are internet savvy and comfortable doing the comparisons on your own, visit www.medicare.gov and shop it yourself.  Please click here for more information on comparing your plan online.   No matter which way you choose – please make sure you review your Part D drug plan this annual enrollment period starting October 15th through December 7th!

And, as always, if you still have questions, do not hesitate to give our office a call at 937-492-8800.

Don’t “Set It and Forget It” This Annual Enrollment Season!

Don’t “Set It and Forget It” This Annual Enrollment Season!

Does anyone remember Ron Popeil?  If you don’t, allow me to rephrase the question.  Does anyone remember the “set it and forget it” infomercial king?

 

I bet it’s ringing a bell now.

 

I, for one, can still see him in his green apron, armed with nothing but some well-seasoned meats and a fancy rotisserie cooker, taking the cheesy and overly scripted infomercial world by storm: “All you have to do is…”  The unrealistically enthused audience chants, “SET IT AND FORGET IT!”

 

He was like the Billy Mays of the 70s, but with food instead of cleaning products.

 

But I digress…back to the topic at hand.  The reason I retrieved this slogan from memory lane is to make a point: Many people have the “set it and forget it” mindset with their Medicare Health Insurance Plans.  They think that once they undergo the process of enrolling in Medicare, enrolling in supplemental coverage or an Advantage plan, and signing up for a drug plan that they never have to change anything again.  Happily ever after.

 

But this just isn’t true.  Yes, most of the work is done.  And you’ve definitely done the minimum to get by.  But there’s a good chance your situation will change over time.  And, even if your situation doesn’t change, there is a very good chance your health care plans will, oftentimes drastically.  This leaves you in an ill-fitting plan that doesn’t meet your needs or your budget.  You may need to switch!

 

When it comes to Medicare Annual Enrollment, there is a reason for the season.  From October 15—December 7, you have the opportunity to make strategic changes to your health care plans.

 

Here are 3 reasons you might need to make changes this year!

 

The Medicare Supplement Creep

Medicare Supplements are typically consistent from year to year.  The benefits are guaranteed to stay the same, and the premiums rarely increase drastically.  But the premium cost almost always creeps up, dollar by dollar, slowly but surely.

 

If you stay on that ride for too long, you could end up paying $100+ more a month than you should.  In fact, if you have been in the same Medicare Supplement Plan for 4-5 years, there’s a good chance you’re paying too much for it.  Shopping around for a better deal this year could save you hundreds…and all without reducing your coverage.

 

REMINDER:  You can change your Medicare Supplement any time of year (click here for related info), not just annual enrollment.

 

The Advantage Plan Leap

There are so many aspects of an Advantage Plan that can frog around over time.  The deductible may go up.  The premium may go down.  You might have higher copays.  Your coinsurance might drop.  And beyond benefits and price, doctors and hospitals may go in and out of your plan’s network.  A doctor available to you this year, may not be available the next.

 

This is why it is important to review your plan.  Is your family doctor still within the plan’s network?  Is it still the best value for you?  If you simply set it, forget it and let it skate by another year, you’ll never know.

 

The Drug Plan Drop

A drug plan may vary in cost from year to year, but what you really need to check is the list of medications the policy covers, also known as the formulary.

 

Over the years, a drug plan may discontinue or reduce coverage on certain medications.  Imagine if the drug it discontinued was your most expensive one, and you didn’t realize it.  Yeah…it could be a financial disaster.

 

Review Your Plan This Year!

So make sure to take control of your health insurance options.  Review your plans, and take careful note of all the changes.  The “set it and forget it” philosophy might work well for cooking chickens, but it doesn’t work for this.

 

For your health insurance, I offer another slogan:  If you set it and forget it, you might regret it.

 

Maybe that will catch on…

 

Yeah…probably not.

 

Looking to review your plans with a Certified Senior Advisor? Call Seniormark at 937-492-8800 for a free consultation.

Take Advantage of What Medicare Covers in FULL

Take Advantage of What Medicare Covers in FULL

Medicare alone doesn’t cover very much in full. There’s almost always some sort of coinsurance or copayment or other out-of-pocket cost.  This is why many people purchase Medicare Supplement Insurance to fill in the gaps (I recommend that you do so as well).

 

But there is something that Medicare fully covers—and that is preventive services. This includes lab tests, screenings, vaccinations, virtually any service performed to ensure that health problems are caught early—before they become…well…even bigger and more threatening problems.

 

This means that—as long as you meet basic eligibility requirements—you won’t pay a dime for most preventive services. The only ones I found that required any out-of-pocket costs were glaucoma screenings, diabetes self-management training, digital rectal exams (to detect prostate cancer), and barium enema (to detect colon cancer).

 

To give you an idea of the scope of preventive services that Medicare offers, here is a quick list:

  • Colonoscopies
  • Mammograms
  • Annual Wellness Visits
  • Diabetes Screenings
  • Vaccinations
  • Blood Tests
  • Depression Screenings

And this is just scratching the surface.

For a more comprehensive list with all the details, click here to access the Medicare preventive services guide.

 

Keep Track of Preventive Services on mymedicare.gov!

Some of these services are offered every year, some every other year, and some less or more often. Your risk level for certain diseases (based on age, gender, or family history) can also play a factor in how often you are eligible for services. Needless to say, it can be a lot to manage, which is why I recommend using mymedicare.gov. This free online account (among other things) allows you to see which preventive services you are eligible for and when.  Sign up here:  MyMedicare.  You can also print off a personalized report to bring to your doctor. This will help the both of you plan out when and if you should receive the various services.

 

I hope you consider taking advantage of what Medicare has made available. The reason they made it free is because they know how important it is for retirees to take care of themselves in a proactive way. It is good for them, and it is good for you—money wise and otherwise.  No one likes to spend time at a cold doctor’s office, especially when getting a colonoscopy (geesh). But staying on top of your health now, can save you having to deal with major health issues later. It can keep you on the go and healthy during retirement, an era of life that I believe should be as (if not more) fulfilling and exciting as all the rest.

 

Have any questions or concerns about Medicare? Call Seniormark at 937-492-8800 for a free consultation.

Turning 65 and not sure what to do?  Consider signing up for one of our FREE workshops in Sidney or Vandalia, Ohio!  Sign up here:  Seniormark workshops.

Can I Really Get a Medicare Advantage Plan For Free?

Can I Really Get a Medicare Advantage Plan For Free?

Yes, for quite a few Medicare Advantage plans, you will not have to pay a dime in premiums. And to sweeten to deal, you can even get extra benefits like gym memberships or a built in drug coverage with some plans. But I’m very stingy with my use of the word “free.”

 

From my experience, an Advantage Plan is free in the same way the newborn puppies of your best friend’s dog are “free.” You may not have to pay for the puppy, but how many know having man’s best friend around the house isn’t exactly a recipe for super savings (especially if you’ve got furniture and footwear that look especially appetizing in black and white)?

 

You see, a Medicare Advantage Plan might not cost anything in premiums, but it may eat up your money in the end. I’m not saying they aren’t right for some people, in fact; I’ve placed people in $0 Advantage Plans to their long-term satisfaction. For the cost-conscious retiree who is romping into retirement, healthy as a horse, it may be the best option. But before you purchase one, make sure you understand the hassles and extra costs that come along with the decision. I’ve outlined a few of the most important ones:

 

Networks

Advantage Plans have networks of health care providers that they have contracted with, usually within a fairly tight geographic area. If you do not receive care at one of their pre-picked providers, it can mean much higher copays and coinsurance amounts. If you are in an HMO plan, they may not even cover you at all while receiving care out of network. This can work just fine for a person who stays local most of the year, but it does put the burden on you to ensure that your health care provider is in-network. Making mistakes could cost you heavily.

 

Inconsistency

With a Medicare Supplement, the benefits are stable, but with an Advantage Plan, this is hardly ever the case.

 

Since the private insurance companies that offer Advantage Plans re-file their contract with Medicare every year, the benefits always change—sometimes dramatically. One of your preferred doctors could go out of network. Copayments, coinsurance, and deductibles can all shoot up. This is why you must review your plan every year so you won’t be caught unaware. If you set your plan to the side and forget about it (see “Don’t Set it and Forget It!) for even one year, it can be quite upsetting financially.

 

Potentially High Out-of-pocket Costs

I always like to remind people that Advantage Plans have more of a “pay as you go” approach. You pay less in premiums, yes.  But you may make up for it in deductibles, copayments, and coinsurance. For example, almost all Advantage Plans still keep you on the hook for the 20% coinsurance on Part B. That’s fine for an x-ray, but not as much for an outpatient surgery that may be $20,000 or more.

So be aware, Advantage plans do limit your annual out-of-pocket spending, but these caps are generally pretty high. If you have a period of extended illness, you could spend anywhere from $3500-6000 per year or more!

 

That doesn’t sound like free to me.

 

Need Expert Help Navigating Medicare? Confused About Your Options?

Click here to sign up for our free Medicare workshop or call our office at 937-492-8800 and get the guidance you need! No high-pressure sales pitches here, just in-depth discussion about the ins and outs of Medicare!

6 Annual Enrollment Dates You (Quite Literally) Can’t Afford to Forget

6 Annual Enrollment Dates You (Quite Literally) Can’t Afford to Forget

I know you’ve got a lot of dates to juggle: birthdays, anniversaries, holiday get togethers, or departure dates for long awaited travel plans. But you have to leave some empty space—in your memory and on your calendar—to add these 6 dates.

 

Why?

 

Because the Medicare Annual Enrollment Period is upon us, a time when the Medicare marketplace is bustling with transactions. Beneficiaries such as yourself are switching Drug Plans, Advantage Plans, or transitioning from an Advantage Plan to a Medicare Supplement or vice versa. These are strategic moves you can only make during Annual Enrollment!

 

Now, if you are thinking, “I’m perfectly fine with my health insurance. I’ll just let it go this year,” I’d like to offer a word of warning: Not reviewing your Medicare health insurance plans this Annual Enrollment Period could cost you thousands. You see, Benefits and premiums change from year to year, so you have to review your plans with a professional to ensure you are still in the best-valued plan for your needs.

 

It doesn’t seem like letting it slide just one year could end up being so costly, but I’ve seen it happen again and again. In fact, I recently had a man come into my office in January, confused about why his approximately $190 per month prescription wasn’t covered anymore. As it turns out, he missed Annual Enrollment. The insurance company dropped his prescription from their formulary (list of covered drugs) for the new year. Unfortunately, I had to tell him, he was stuck in the ill-fitting Drug Plan for the whole year, the consequences of a mistake that would (by the end of the year) cost him $2,280. Ouch.

 

So, if you are a current Medicare beneficiary, get your pen ready and calendar ready. Annual Enrollment (October 15—December 7) is chock full of clear-cut deadlines. Don’t find yourself locked into a financially draining health insurance plan! You (quite literally) can’t afford to miss these 6 dates:

1. October 1st

This is the day we, as an insurance agency, receive all of the new information regarding plan changes.

  • Did your Drug Plan drop your most expensive prescription from its formulary?
  • Was there a premium hike?
  • If you have an Advantage Plan, is your doctor still considered “in-network?”

October 1st is the day we have all these answers and can speak to you about the possibility of switching to save you money and hassle.

 

Note: You can call about your options anytime during Annual Enrollment, but the earlier is truly the better. This time of year is quite busy!

2.October 15

The marketplace is open!  Annual enrollment has officially begun, and you can now enroll in a new plan.

3.December 7

I hope you have made all the necessary changes, because—at this date—you are locked into your plans for another year. Annual enrollment is closed.

4.January 1

It’s a new year, a new resolution, and—quite possibly—new insurance. This is the date any changes you made during the open enrollment period go into effect.

5.January 1

Nope, you didn’t just read the same line twice, and you are not seeing double! I know this is a repeat, but I want to clarify why this date is worth the extra mention: It is also the first day of the Advantage Plan disenrollment period. Just in case you’re second-guessing your decision, Medicare set up a disenrollment period where you can get out of your Advantage Plan with no penalties.

6.February 14

Finally, this is the last day of Medicare’s disenrollment period. If you are in an Advantage Plan and don’t like it, this is your last chance to drop it!

BONUS: February 14th is also Valentine’s Day. You’re welcome.

 

Looking to Review Your Plans With a Medicare Expert?

Even if you are not yet sure if you want to switch, I recommend giving Seniormark a call at 937-492-8800! Our friendly and caring staff is more than willing to be a resource during this bustling Annual Enrollment season. We will help ensure you meet all the deadlines and end up in a great plan for your needs and pocketbook as the New Year rolls around.