Category: Medicare Drug Plan

10 Medicare Terms To Get You Started

10 Medicare Terms To Get You Started

If you’ve ever done research in your life, you know that knowledgeable people sometimes overdo it. They use words that only other life-long Medicare experts would know.

 

And when you ask them to explain, what do they do? Use even bigger and scarier words to describe the ones you didn’t understand in the first place. Our philosophy: Never use a big word, when a singularly un-loquacious and diminutive linguistic expression will do the trick.

 

Over our 19 years of helping retirees, it has served us well. Now we are here to pass our knowledge onto you in words you understand. To get started, here are 10 commonly used terms:

1. Medicare

At the top of the list, I like to kick-it-off with the basics. Medicare is a government-run health care program for those over 65. It is also for younger people with disabilities or kidney failure, but its primary concern is to serve the older generation.

2. Medicaid

This is often confused with Medicare, but they are completely different programs. Although they both serve the same purpose (to provide health insurance), Medicaid is for people with low income. There is a chance that you might be eligible for both programs at the same time.

3. Medicare Beneficiary

This is you. Or if you haven’t signed up yet, it will be you very soon. A Medicare beneficiary is a person enrolled in Medicare, receiving Medicare benefits.

4. Initial Enrollment Period (IEP)

The IEP is made up of 3 parts: the 3 months before you turn 65, your 65th birthday month, and the 3 months after. This 7-month window is the time that most people should sign up for Medicare. If you miss your IEP, it could lead to costly penalties. So pay attention. Like all time, those 7 months will fly by!

5. Part A

Medicare is divided up into 4 parts (A, B, C, and D). And Part A is your inpatient care. It includes nursing care, hospice, and some home health services. But—for the most part—it is coverage for when you are officially checked-in at a hospital.

6. Part B

Part B is exactly the opposite of Part A. It is your outpatient care, including lab tests, medically necessary supplies, and various screenings. To keep simple, Part B is care received while checked-out of the hospital.

7. Original (Traditional) Medicare

This one is simple. Whenever someone refers to original (or traditional) Medicare, they are referring to Parts A and B together.

8. Part C (Medicare Advantage)

Medicare Advantage is an alternative to original Medicare offered through private insurance companies that have contracted with Medicare. In other words, they replace Medicare as your health insurance provider. About 1 in 4 people choose Medicare Advantage, according to the Reader’s Digest. To find out the advantages and disadvantages of Part C, click here.

NOTE: You still have to sign up for Parts A and B to be eligible for Part C.

9. Part D

Part D is your drug plan. It covers your prescription medications. Also offered through private insurance companies, almost everyone signs up for Part D in addition to original Medicare (Parts A and B).

10. Medicare Supplement Insurance

A supplement is fondly nicknamed a “Medigap plan.” It is referred to this way because it “fills in the gaps” of what Medicare Parts A and B doesn’t cover on its own. Without it, you leave yourself quite vulnerable. There is no limit to what you could spend in uncovered health care costs!

That should be enough to get you started on this often-overwhelming journey of Medicare planning. As you continue to learn more and plan your retirement, we are committed to keeping you up-to date and informed…in words you can understand. How did we do? Leave us a comment below to pose any questions or concerns!

 

Turning 65 soon and confused about Medicare? Click here to sign up for our free Medicare workshop. No high-pressure sales pitches here, just in-depth discussion about the ins and outs of Medicare! We put it into words you can understand.

 

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Attention Retirees: Premiums Shouldn’t Rule Your Healthcare Plan Decisions

Attention Retirees: Premiums Shouldn’t Rule Your Healthcare Plan Decisions

It is easy to do. If you’ve got a tight budget to think about, a drug plan with a low monthly premium is appealing. And if your past is fraught with health scares, it feels more secure to go with a high premium Medicare Supplement for “more comprehensive coverage”.

But you’ve got a lot more to consider when it comes to healthcare decisions: deductibles, coinsurance, copays, and medications, just to name a few. “Tunnel vision” focus on premiums will not help you make a smart decision.

 

Here are two examples why:

 

Lower Does Not Mean Better.

For a drug plan, people get in big trouble choosing a low premium drug plan hastily. Just because your friend or neighbor has an $18 per month drug plan that works for them, doesn’t mean it will work for you.

 

You have to consider your medications. Different drug plans cover medications at varying levels. If you are on an expensive drug and it isn’t on that plan’s formulary, it isn’t covered. If it is on a different tier, it could affect the dollar amount of copays you spend. Saving $10-15 a month on premiums isn’t worth it if you are paying an extra $150 a month on copays, coinsurance, or uncovered drugs. Pay the extra in premium for a drug plan that is right for you. Lower isn’t always better!

 

Higher isn’t always better, either.

I find that perceptions sometimes flip when it comes to Medicare Supplement Insurance. Clients believe that the most expensive and comprehensive plan is right for them, employing “you get what you pay for” logic. This saying is true a lot of times, but not always.

For instance, you can save approximately $20 per month by switching from a plan G to a plan N. The only difference between these two is a couple copays: $20 for office visits and $50 for emergency room visits.

This is where I lose people. They just don’t want the copays. But take a closer look. Is the free doctor and emergency room visits worth the extra $240 a year in premium? If you’re in good health, you probably only go to the doctor a few times a year for a general wellness test. It might save you $200 per year to go with a lesser coverage plan. In this case, it’s not worth it. When you compare the most comprehensive Plan F with G (see our blog “Underrated Plan G” by clicking here), you have another example, and that one is a no-brainer!

Of course, these choices are still up to you and your preferences. All I am asking you to do is not let premiums rule your decisions.

I’ve seen it work. Free thought leads to better value, all the time!

Need help shopping a Medicare Supplement Plan? Call Seniormark at 937-492-8800 for a free consultation!

 

Attention Retirees: Don’t Fall For These 2 Medicare Sales Tactics

Attention Retirees: Don’t Fall For These 2 Medicare Sales Tactics

Before the Medicare Improvements for Patients and Providers Act passed in July of 2008, Medicare Supplement salespeople had the upper hand. They could call you as much as they wished and show up at your doorstep uninvited. Medicare sales were practically a warzone.

Now, however, they have to be a little bit more clever about their sales tactics. Since they can’t contact you (except by mail) without your consent, they have to find some way to get permission from you—whether you realize what you are asking for or not. Here are two key strategies they use.

Online Quote Generators

It seems like an easy way to shop and compare Medicare Supplement prices in your area, but it may lead to a bombardment of unwanted calls and emails. Here’s how it works: When you put in your personal information like phone number or email, you consent to being contacted. You are essentially (but unknowingly) saying “hit me with your best shot!”

This is when the owner of these quote generators can sell your information to as many agents who care to buy. If you are one of the unlucky few whose contact is sold widely, you are in for an Armageddon of sales calls just like the barrage a client of ours so nobly braved. He claimed that within one minute of plugging in his phone number, the calls stormed in. To spare you the details, let’s just say he stopped picking up after 30 calls.

Tear and Return Reply Cards

I’ll bet your mailbox is practically bursting with Medicare literature. And I’ll bet a lot of them have a tear off reply card that asks for your contact information. Although it may seem official with its big “Do Not Destroy” stamps or fancy seals, this can be a ploy as well. If you can’t tell by the other content, there is a dead give away at the bottom of the mail in fine print where it says that an insurance representative may contact you.

 

“No. I’m not interested.”

I hope you don’t read this as “everything I get in the mail is bad” or “I should never give anyone my contact information” because this is simply not the case. There are wonderfully helpful people in the Medicare business who ask for your personal information. In fact, although we don’t ask for personal information, we send out mailers every month and have a quoting tool on our website!

The purpose of this post is to help you understand the difference between someone who trying to assist you and someone who is trying to badger you. No one wants his inbox overrun with spam. No one wants to answer a firing squad of phone calls a day with a sighing “I’m not interested.”

We know you don’t either.

If you would like to shop Medicare Supplements safely, click here to access our quoting tool. We don’t ask for any personal information!

Know The Drug Plan Lingo! 5 Terms to Get You Started

Know The Drug Plan Lingo! 5 Terms to Get You Started

Every field or discipline has its own language. And to the undiscerning ear, it can all run together into nonsensical jargon. Mumbo jumbo. Gibberish. Flim flam. Drivel. You get the idea. But if you want to walk the walk and get ahead, you must first talk the talk. To get you started, you’ve probably come across these 6 terms in your Part D Drug Plan research.

 

Formulary

I’ll start with an easy one. The formulary is simply the list of drugs a particular plan covers. There are 24 drug plans at your disposal. Not all of them will cover the same medications. This is why it is important to check a plan’s formulary to find out if it’s right for you.

 

Prior Authorization

If a drug plan requires prior authorization, it means that they will not cover certain drugs unless your doctor or prescriber proves that the medication is medically necessary.

 

Step Therapy

Drug companies do not want you on an expensive drug when a less expensive one will be just as effective. For this reason, they will often make their beneficiaries start on a generic or cheaper drug as a trial to see if it works just as well. If it doesn’t, then the beneficiary can “step” up to the more expensive (often name brand) medication. This is called step therapy.

 

Quantity Limit

Quantity limit is exactly what it sounds like: a limit on the quantity of a specific drug that a plan will cover. Drug companies limit quantity to reduce waste, curb drug costs, and prevent unsafe use. For example, if someone is on a pain medication with a standard dosage of 2 per day, the quantity limit for a month will likely be 60 pills. They don’t want people getting addicted or wasting them through misuse or carelessness.

 

Tiers

Drug plan companies often organize the medications they cover into levels or “tiers”. Drugs on a lower tier (often generic brands) have lower associated costs such as copayments or coinsurance. Drugs on a higher tier (such as name brand or specialty drugs) often have higher costs.

 

The Donut Hole

The donut hole is a gap is prescription drug coverage. After you reach $3,310 in total drug costs, you enter the donut hole (resulting in higher out-of-pocket costs). After you reach 4,850 in out-pocket costs, you leave the donut hole and enter into what is known as “catastrophic” coverage where the plan will cover 95% of your drug costs.

 

All done! If you finished reading this, your Medicare literacy just increased. But if you have run into any more difficult terms, leave a comment. We are more than willing to answer your questions. Or visit Medicare Interactive’s glossary for additional Medicare vocabulary.

 

Have other Medicare questions? Turning 65 soon and not sure what to do? Click here to sign up for our free Medicare workshop. No high-pressure sales pitches here, just in-depth discussion about the ins and outs of Medicare!

What Is the Fastest Way to Sign Up For Medicare?

What Is the Fastest Way to Sign Up For Medicare?

Once you’ve determined that it’s time to apply and have carefully considered all of your options, you are now ready to sign up for Medicare. You’ve got grandkids to get back to, family events to plan, and the world to explore, so you probably want to get this item off your to-do list as quickly as possible.

 

Fortunately, the federal government understands you in this respect. In response, they have designed a user-friendly website and an online enrollment process. It’s quick (taking only about 10 minutes). It’s easy (because you don’t have to leave the comfort of home). And the very fact that you are reading this blog proves you are tech-savvy enough to handle it.

 

To Apply Online, Just Follow These Few Simple Steps:

  1. Go to Social Security’s Website
  2. Click on the “Menu” Tab.
  3. In the “Benefits” section, choose “Medicare”.
  4. Scroll down and click the “Apply for Medicare Only” button.  (you will only be applying for medical coverage — not social security payments)
  5. In the “Apply and Complete” section, choose “Start a New Application”.
  6. The site will guide you from there.

 

Slow Down Partner!

But just wait! Before you start clicking away gung ho, I want you to consider how much thought you’ve put into your Medicare decisions. Not because I want to keep you from your grandkids, but because I know making mistakes in this process can result in unnecessary penalties and unexpected costs. If you haven’t sat down with a retirement expert in consultation, I strongly recommend doing so. It will take extra time, but—as the clichéd saying goes—sometimes slow and steady wins the race.

 

If you need someone to take this weight off your shoulders, give Seniormark a call at 937-492-8800. We make retirement decisions as quick and painless as possible!

 

Will I Be Able to Afford Medicare?

Will I Be Able to Afford Medicare?

The shortest and most honest answer is “I don’t know”. But I know this doesn’t help you answer the most pressing questions weighing on your mind as you approach retirement age. Am I ready? Or Should I delay my retirement? And most of all—how am I going to afford health care without my employer insurance?

 

So here’s what I am going to do. Using my 20 years of experience working with retirees, I am going to lay out a framework for what to expect when it comes to Medicare expenses. These will just be “in-the-ballpark” figures, but I believe they will help you come to a decision. You just might find that Medicare falls squarely into your budget.

 

So let’s get started with some good news.

 

Medicare Part A (Inpatient Care) Is Free

As long as you’ve paid into Social Security for at least 10 years, social security will return the favor with no associated Part A premium.

 

The Associated Part B (Outpatient Care) Monthly Premium is $134.00

This figure is adjusted for high income, but most people don’t fall into the high-income category. $134.00 will be your monthly premium unless you make $85,000 per year or more as an individual or $170,000 filing jointly.

 

From this point, the cost of Medicare is heavily affected by which path you take. You can boil down all the madness into two basic choices: Medicare Advantage or Original (traditional) Medicare.

 

The Traditional Medicare Route

If you choose the Traditional Medicare route, you will want Medicare Supplement Insurance to fill in the gaps of what Medicare doesn’t cover. Otherwise, there will be no limit to your out-of-pocket spending. The premiums for a Medicare Supplement range from $45-146 per month. However, we often recommend a plan G, which typically costs $110 per month. This is a fairly standard premium. It puts into perspective what you can expect a Medicare Supplement Plan to cost.

 

To cover your medications, you will also need a Part D prescription drug plan, which will cost in additional premium anywhere between $15 to $128 monthly. The average cost for a drug plan is $35.63 in 2017. The out-of-pocket costs associated with Part D vary greatly depending on your medications. It is impossible to estimate without knowing your specific situation.

 

The Medicare Advantage Route

Offered as an alternative to Traditional Medicare, Medicare Advantage is often the cheaper option when it comes to premiums. They are offered for prices within the range of $0-163 monthly with the average premium being approximately $60 per month. The Part D prescription drug plan is almost always rolled into the plan.

 

Caution: Check For Possible Out-of-pocket Costs

At first glance, it looks like the Medicare Advantage route is the obvious choice. But this fails to take into account the risk of out-of-pocket costs. With a Medicare Supplement (only available with Original Medicare), the maximum out-of-pocket is only $166-366 annually for Plan G. However, in an advantage plan, it is more of a pay-as-you-go approach. There are less monthly premiums; but copays, coinsurance, and deductibles are much higher. The potential out-of-pocket for an advantage plan can be as a high as $3500-6000 per year or more!

 

The Costs At a Glance


So there you have it! This should give you a good idea of what Medicare costs for the average 65-year old. But—as I said before—the cost of Medicare is different for every person. If you are still concerned about being able to afford Medicare, contact us for a free consultation. We will assess your financial and health situation to find an overall plan that meets your needs, concerns, and pocketbook. Ensuring you a successful and secure transition into retirement is our number one priority.

 

There are a lot circumstances that may prevent you from retiring. But I believe that the affordability of health insurance shouldn’t be one.

 

Disclaimer: Numbers are based on Ohio 45365.

 

Turning 65 soon and not sure what to do? Click here to sign up for our free Medicare workshop. No high-pressure sales pitches here, just in-depth discussion about the ins and outs of Medicare!

photo credit:  http://www.espace.cool/prudence-how-much-can-we-afford/

Medicare Part B and D: Make More = Pay More

Medicare Part B and D: Make More= Pay More

It’s true. The premiums for your Part B and D coverage for Medicare are adjusted for income.

 

I get it. It’s a little infuriating. You’ve spent all of these working years paying more in Social Security than everyone else, and now you find out they might come back for seconds.

 

But before any public pickets or private fist-shaking takes place, I want to grant you a little bit of comfort: according to Social Security, less than 5% of Medicare beneficiaries pay higher premiums due to income. And out of our clients, we’ve only come across a handful of affected people.

 

But to make sure, I recommend checking out the following chart. NOTE: There are separate numbers for filing individually, jointly, and filing individually when married, so make sure you are looking at the right one.

 

If your yearly income (modified adjusted gross income) in 2015 (for what you pay in 2017) was
File individual tax return File joint tax return File married & separate tax return You pay each month in 2017 for Part B  

You pay each month in 2017 for Part D

 

$85,000 or less $170,000 or less $85,000 or less $134  

Your plan premium

 

Above $85,000 up to $107,000 Above $170,000 up to $214,000 Not applicable $187.50  

$13.30 + your plan premium

 

Above $107,000 up to $160,000 Above $214,000 up to $320,000 Not applicable $267.90  

$34.20 + your plan premium

 

Above $160,000 up to $214,000 Above $320,000 up to $428,000 Above $85,000 and up to $129,000 $348.30  

$55.20 + your plan premium

 

Above $214,000 Above $428,000 Above $129,000 $428.60  

$76.20 + your plan premium

 

 

So there you have it. Did you make the cut? And now…

 

4 Things You Need To Know

  1. Premium increases are based on your MAGI

MAGI (Modified Adjusted Gross Income) is the magic number. It is calculated by taking your Adjusted Gross Income (all the income you’ve earned minus deductions) and adding some of those deductions back in such as IRA contributions. It is a little hairy, but for most people their Adjusted Gross Income is so similar to their MAGI, it is irrelevant.

 

  1. It is based on the tax return you filed last year

So, in 2017, whether or not you are cursed with higher premiums is determined by the tax return you filed in 2016 based on your 2015 income.

 

  1. Being married but filing separately can have costly effects

Pay close attention to those numbers. You’ll notice that the premium increases are much higher for comparable amounts of income. So file jointly unless you have a really good reason for doing otherwise.

 

  1. You can appeal to have the increase removed

This is a big one. The government has been known to make mistakes. So, if you notice that you were wrongly charged, you can fill out an appeal, and they will double check (I’ll keep my fingers crossed for you). This is especially helpful in the case of a “life changing” event that drops your income. The Medicare approved “life changing” events include but are not limited to:

  • Divorce
  • Marriage
  • Death of spouse
  • Work Stoppage
  • Loss of Pension

If you believe your IRMAA is incorrect, you can request that the Social Security Administration make a new decision.  You can contact them on the national helpline at 800-772-1213.

 

For those of higher income, it does seem like the government is doing a double dip. But I sincerely hope that you are not one of those affected individuals. Thankfully, the measure excludes most!

 

Confused about Medicare and not sure what to do next? Download our free E-book to get you started.   If you still have questions, call our office at 937-492-8800.

 

Photo:  www.affordablemedicareplan.com

Don’t “Set It and Forget It” This Annual Enrollment Season!

Don’t “Set It and Forget It” This Annual Enrollment Season!

 

Does anyone remember Ron Popeil? If you don’t, allow me to rephrase the question. Does anyone remember the “set it and forget it” infomercial king?

 

I bet it’s ringing a bell now.

 

I, for one, can still see him in his green apron, armed with nothing but some well-seasoned meats and a fancy rotisserie cooker, taking the cheesy and overly scripted infomercial world by storm: “All you have to do is…” The unrealistically enthused audience chants, “SET IT AND FORGET IT!”

 

He was like the Billy Mays of the 70s, but with food instead of cleaning products.

 

But I digress…back to the topic at hand. The reason I retrieved this slogan from memory lane is to make a point: Many people have the “set it and forget it” mindset with their Medicare Health Insurance Plans. They think that once they undergo the process of enrolling in Medicare, enrolling in supplemental coverage or an Advantage plan, and signing up for a drug plan that they never have to change anything again. Happily ever after.

 

But this just isn’t true. Yes, most of the work is done. And you’ve definitely done the minimum to get by. But there’s a good chance your situation will change over time. And, even if your situation doesn’t change, there is a very good chance your health care plans will, oftentimes drastically. This leaves you in an ill-fitting plan that doesn’t meet your needs or your budget. You may need to switch!

 

When it comes to Medicare Annual Enrollment, there is a reason for the season. From October 15—December 7, you have the opportunity to make strategic changes to your health care plans.

 

Here are 3 reasons you might need to make changes this year!

 

1.  The Medicare Supplement Creep

Medicare Supplements are typically consistent from year to year. The benefits are guaranteed to stay the same, and the premiums rarely increase drastically. But the premium cost almost always creeps up, dollar by dollar, slowly but surely.

 

If you stay on that ride for too long, you could end up paying $100+ more a month than you should. In fact, if you have been in the same Medicare Supplement Plan for 4-5 years, there’s a good chance you’re paying too much for it. Shopping around for a better deal this year could save you hundreds…and all without reducing your coverage.

 

REMINDER: You can change your Medicare Supplement any time of year, not just annual enrollment.

 

2.  The Advantage Plan Leap

There are so many aspects of an Advantage Plan that can frog around over time. The deductible may go up. The premium may go down. You might have higher copays. Your coinsurance might drop. And beyond benefits and price, doctors and hospitals may go in and out of your plan’s network. A doctor available to you this year, may not be available the next.

 

This is why it is important to review your plan. Is your family doctor still within the plan’s network? Is it still the best value for you? If you simply set it, forget it and let it skate by another year, you’ll never know.

 

3.  The Drug Plan Drop

A drug plan may vary in cost from year to year, but what you really need to check is the list of medications the policy covers, also known as the formulary.

 

Over the years, a drug plan may discontinue or reduce coverage on certain medications. Imagine if the drug it discontinued was your most expensive one, and you didn’t realize it. Yeah…it could be a financial disaster.

 

Review Your Plan This Year!

So make sure to take control of your health insurance options. Review your plans, and take careful note of all the changes. The “set it and forget it” philosophy might work well for cooking chickens, but it doesn’t work for this.

 

For your health insurance, I offer another slogan: If you set it and forget it, you might regret it.

 

Maybe that will catch on…

 

Yeah…probably not.

 

If you haven’t already downloaded our Annual Enrollment Checklist, there is no time like the present!  Make sure you have completed it — and then you can forget it — until next year this time!  Download it here:  https://seniormark.com/annual-enrollment-period-checklist/.

 

Looking to review your plans with a Certified Senior Advisor? Call Seniormark at 937-492-8800 for a free consultation.

 

Warning Retirees: 5 (or 6) Annual Enrollment Dates You Don’t Want to Miss

Warning Retirees: 5 (or 6) Annual Enrollment Dates You Don’t Want to Miss

Clip these dates up on your fridge. Write them on your calendar. Sticky note them to your bathroom mirror or your spouse’s forehead (or maybe not). Annual enrollment is approaching!

 

But before we get into the dates, you’ll first want to know…

 

What Is Annual Enrollment?

Annual enrollment is the busy time of the year for Insurance agencies such as ours. Department stores have their black Friday. Local ice cream shops have their last day of school. And Insurance companies have the Annual Enrollment Period. During this roughly 3-month time frame (October 15- December 7), all Medicare beneficiaries are free to change their plans. They can switch from:

  • An Advantage Plan to a Medicare Supplement
  • A Medicare Supplement to an Advantage Plan
  • One Advantage Plan to another
  • One Part D Drug Plan to another
  • One Medicare Supplement to another (Although you can do this at any point during the year)

The Annual Enrollment Period is for any existing Medicare beneficiary. For those just turning 65 and joining Medicare, you have a different enrollment period called the Initial Enrollment Period, which is the 7-month time frame that surrounds your 65th birthday month. But for those of you who have already enrolled for the 1st time, this is for you!

 

There are 6 very important dates for you to remember.

  1. October 1

This is the day we get all the plan changes, details, benefits, and prices for the following year. It is also when we can start talking to you about which ones will best fit your needs.

  1. October 15

Let the games begin! Annual enrollment is officially started. You can now enroll in a new plan.

  1. December 7

I hope you like the choices you’ve made because, at this date, you are locked into your plans for another year. Annual enrollment is closed.

  1. January 1

It’s a new year, a new resolution, and—quite possibly—new insurance. This is the date any changes you made during the open enrollment period go into effect.

  1. January 1

I apologize for the unsettling déjà vu. I know this is a repeat, but I want to emphasize why this date is doubly important: It is also the first day of the Advantage Plan disenrollment period. Just in case you’ve got some buyer’s remorse, Medicare set up a disenrollment period where you can get out of your Advantage Plan.

  1. February 14

All good things must come to an end. This is the last day of Medicare’s disenrollment period. If you are in an Advantage Plan and don’t like it, this is your last chance to drop it!

BONUS: February 14th is also Valentine’s Day. You’re welcome.

 

And that’s it! I hope you commit these dates to memory or you write them down somewhere. If you forget it, you might regret it!

 

To be sure you have covered ALL of your bases, be sure to download our AEP Checklist by clicking here.

 

Look to switch plans during open enrollment?  Call Seniormark at 937-492-8800 for a free consultation.

Do you “wonder” who is turning 65? Read below to find out!

Lynda-Carter

July 12—Cheryl Ladd

Cheryl_Ladd The actress, singer and author is best known for her role as Kris Munroe in the ABC television series Charlie’s Angels, replacing Farrah-Fawcett Majors. The popular 1976 to 1981 series followed the adventures of three women working in a private detective agency in Los Angeles. Born in South Dakota, Ladd initially came to Hollywood in 1970 to begin a career in music as a singing voice on Hanna-Barbera’s Josie and the Pussycats animated series. She soon began to land non-singing roles in commercials and episodic television, including guest appearances on shows such as The Rookies, The Partridge Family and Happy Days. The Charlie’s Angels series made her an overnight star, and Ladd guest-starred in musical-comedy variety series and specials, plus she released three albums, including a Top 40 Billboard Hot 100 single and a Gold record. In 2000, Ladd starred on Broadway in a revival of Irving Berlin’s Annie Get Your Gun.

Following Charlie’s Angels, Ladd starred in more than 30 made-for-television films, including as Grace Kelly and in Purple Hearts, Millennium and Poison Ivy. Ladd had the lead role in the television series One West Waikiki (1994–96), and made guest appearances in other TV shows. She’s published two books: the children’s book The Adventures of Little Nettie Windship (1996) and Token Chick: A Woman’s Guide to Golfing With the Boys (2005).

July 24—Lynda Carter

Lynda-CarterThe actress, singer, songwriter and beauty pageant titleholder starred in the TV series Wonder Woman from 1975 to 1979. In 1978, Carter was voted “The Most Beautiful Woman in the World” by the International Academy of Beauty and the British Press Organization. Carter started out by winning a local Arizona beauty contest and gained national attention in the United States by winning Miss World USA, representing Arizona. After taking acting classes at several New York acting schools, she made her first acting appearance on the 1974 police drama Nakia. She then began making appearances on such TV shows as Starsky and Hutch and Cos, and in several “B” movies.

Carter’s acting career took off when she landed the starring role on Wonder Woman as the title character and her secret identity, Diana Prince. Carter’s earnest performance endeared her to fans and critics, such that Carter continues to be closely identified with Wonder Woman. Credits since then include the title role in Rita Hayworth: The Love Goddess (1983) and a variety of her own musical TV specials, including Lynda Carter’s Special (1980) and Body and Soul (1984). Throughout the 1990s, Carter appeared in a string of television movies. In 2001, she was cast in the independent comedy feature Super Troopers as Vermont Governor Jessma, and played a washed-up, former beauty queen in The Creature of the Sunny Side Up Trailer Park (2004). Carter made her first appearance in a major feature film in numerous years in the big-screen remake of The Dukes of Hazzard (2005).

In 2005, Carter played “Mama Morton” in the West End London production of Chicago. In 2007, Carter toured the U.S. with her one-woman musical cabaret show, An Evening with Lynda Carter. In June 2009, her second album, At Last, was released and reached No. 10 on Billboard’s Jazz Albums Chart. In June 2011, she released her third album, Crazy Little Things, Carter is married to Washington, D.C, attorney Robert A. Altman, and they have two children. They live in Potomac, Md.

Source: Wikipedia